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Peticiones al rey de los pueblos de indios

AGI Guatemala 52-11.jpg

Revision as of Mar 22, 2017, 6:07:28 PM
created by Laura Matthew
Revision as of Mar 22, 2017, 8:54:53 PM
edited by Laura Matthew
Line 1: Line 1:
 
This translation was done by the Yale Nahuatl beginner's class under the guidance of John Sullivan, August 2015. Tlazcamati tlamachtianih huan momachtianih.
 
This translation was done by the Yale Nahuatl beginner's class under the guidance of John Sullivan, August 2015. Tlazcamati tlamachtianih huan momachtianih.
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Line 02, "mamepan", is this "mam(eh)pan"? Could be referencing Mam people but what is the "pan" here?
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Line 04, "timomacehualhuan" "we are your vassals/commoner people", this construction surprised some people at Yale (why are the writers calling themselves commoners?) but seems very comparable to the rhetorical style of the Dakin/Lutz 1996 letters.
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Line 06, "oticaquique", for "cacque", Class 2 verbs not reducing but acting as if Class 1
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Line 08, "totlatzin" our uncle (totlayi), as our friend/brother (totlahtzin), hypercorrection for father (tahtli). Cf to Line 16 "totlatzitzihuan" our fathers.
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Line 11, "titonetiquichipachoa", note the "ne", not a native speaker?

Revision as of Mar 22, 2017, 8:54:53 PM

This translation was done by the Yale Nahuatl beginner's class under the guidance of John Sullivan, August 2015. Tlazcamati tlamachtianih huan momachtianih.

Line 02, "mamepan", is this "mam(eh)pan"? Could be referencing Mam people but what is the "pan" here?

Line 04, "timomacehualhuan" "we are your vassals/commoner people", this construction surprised some people at Yale (why are the writers calling themselves commoners?) but seems very comparable to the rhetorical style of the Dakin/Lutz 1996 letters.

Line 06, "oticaquique", for "cacque", Class 2 verbs not reducing but acting as if Class 1

Line 08, "totlatzin" our uncle (totlayi), as our friend/brother (totlahtzin), hypercorrection for father (tahtli). Cf to Line 16 "totlatzitzihuan" our fathers.

Line 11, "titonetiquichipachoa", note the "ne", not a native speaker?